Archive | Smartphones

Covenant Eyes Now Available on Android – The Wired Homeschool

Many people have been waiting for a version of Covenant Eyes on the Android platform. It has finally arrived!

It is free for subscribers to Covenant Eyes’ accountability software.

If you download and install it, I’d love to hear what you think about it.

We are proud to announce the new Covenant Eyes app is available on Google Play. After many months of testing, we are pleased to release this new product.

Give the app a try and tell us what you think about it!

For more information about the app and how to configure and install it, please visit the Covenant Eyes Breaking Free Blog.

Description from Android Marketplace:

Covenant Eyes is an Internet Accountability service. To use this app you must have a paid subscription, available at CovenantEyes.com.

This app monitors all the browsing and searching on your stock browser. It also monitors the apps you use. This information is compiled into an easy-to-read report and e-mailed to the friends you choose. All websites are rated for maturity (with age-based ratings like T for Teen or M for Mature). Apps are listed by title, along with their App Market genre (like Media & Video) and the amount of time spent using the app each day.

With the increased use of mobile web comes a greater risk. More anonymity and more secrecy can lead to increased inappropriate behavior. Nearly 1 in 5 searches made from mobile devices is for pornography. 25% of smartphone owners admit to having porn on their mobile device, and 84% say they keep it a secret from their romantic partner. Covenant Eyes helps you to get rid of the anonymity and decreases these online temptations.

0

WHS 42 – iOS Restrictions – The Wired Homeschool

If you own an iOS device of any kind (iPod/iPad/iPhone) you’ve probably got iTunes installed on on your home computer.  iTunes is Apple’s portal to managing content (music/videos/apps/books) on all their devices.  Whether you’re using iTunes on OS X or Windows, there are valuable tools at your disposal for managing the content you allow your children to download, view, and purchase.

In part two of this series on iTunes and iOS, I’ll be covering iOS restrictions.  Restrictions are important if you’re going to give your child an iTunes allowance because they help control the type of content available on their device. Next week I plan to cover iTunes parental controls.

To access restrictions tap Settings > General > Restrictions.  You will be prompted to enter a 4-digit pass code.  This should be different from the one you use to unlock the device, especially if you’re configuring restrictions for your children.

Once you’ve entered a pass code, you can choose to restrict access to the following applications and features on the device:

  • Safari
  • YouTube
  • Camera (also disables FaceTime)
  • FaceTime
  • iTunes
  • Ping
  • Installing apps
  • Deleting apps
  • Multiplayer games in Game Center
  • Adding friends in Game Center

Additionally, you can choose to prevent changes to the following settings/accounts:

  • Location Services
  • Accounts (disables changes to Mail, Contacts, Calendars, iCloud, and Twitter accounts)

Finally, prevent access to specific content types:

  • Ratings (select the country in the ratings section to automatically apply the appropriate content ratings for that region)
  • Music and podcasts
  • Movies
  • TV shows
  • Apps
  • In-App Purchases

iOS restrictions are an important p[art of managing your child’s device.  Combine it with iTunes parental controls (which I’ll discuss next week) and an iTunes allowance and you can be confident that you and your children will have a positive experience with portable technology.

Keep in mind that no system is fool-proof and that you must be aware of how your kids are using their devices and what kind of content they are consuming.

Other articles mentioned in this podcast:

App Review – Planets for iOS
Look Up for April 2012
What Happens in an Internet Minute [Infographic]

###

If you’d like to leave feedback about this or any other episode you can call and leave a voice mail by calling 518-290-0228, send email to feedback@thewiredhomeschool.com, or leave a comment on the blog. Follow me on Twitter: @jwilkers. Also follow the podcast on Twitter: @wiredhs. Join the Facebook page over at http://facebook.com/wiredhs

Music: Poofy Reel by Kevin Macleod.

The Wired Homeschool is a proud member of the Tech Podcast Network. For more family-friendly tech podcasts visit techpodcasts.com

1

WHS 41 – iTunes Allowance – The Wired Homeschool

If you own an iOS device of any kind (iPod/iPad/iPhone) you’ve probably got iTunes installed on on your home computer.  iTunes is Apple’s portal to managing content (music, videos, apps, books) on all their devices.  Whether you’re using iTunes on OS X or Windows, there are valuable tools at your disposal for managing the content you allow your children to download, view, and purchase.

In part one of this series on iTunes and iOS, I’ll be covering allowances.  Specifically, how you can give your child a monthly iTunes allowance and prevent them from draining your checking account with purchases. Future topics in this series will include iOS restrictions and iTunes parental controls.

Prerequisites

1. Install the latest version of iTunes on your computer.
2. You need an iTunes Store account (Apple ID) with a credit card associated with it. If you don’t have one, create a new account.
3. You will need to create an Apple ID for your child. That means they need an email address. If your child isn’t ready for email then create a GMail, Yahoo Mail, or Hotmail acount and forward it to your own email address.

Setup an iTunes Allowance Account

1. Open iTunes and got to the Store.
2. Click “Buy iTunes Gifts” from the Quick Links section on the right.
3. Click “Set up an allowance now” (you may need to scroll down).
4. Enter the requested information on the page.
5. Enter your password when/if requested.

Configure the iOS Device

1. Open the App Store on your iOS device.
2. Tap “Featured” at the bottom and scroll down.
3. Tap Sign In.
4. Enter the Apple ID with the monthly allowance.

Additional Considerations

1. When setting up an allowance, you are agreeing to give your child between $10-$50 per month to spend in iTunes. You may consider a one-time gift card as an alternative.
2. You should consider enabling content restrictions on the device and in iTunes (these topics will be covered in future podcasts).
3. No system is fool-proof so check what your kids are doing with their iOS device regularly.

Other things mentioned in this podcast

The Hunger Games – A Homeschool Dad’s Movie Review
Taming the Techno-Beast Review
App Review – Angry Birds Space

###

If you’d like to leave feedback about this or any other episode you can call and leave a voice mail by calling 518-290-0228, send email to feedback@thewiredhomeschool.com, or leave a comment on the blog. Follow me on Twitter: @jwilkers. Also follow the podcast on Twitter: @wiredhs. Join the Facebook page over at http://facebook.com/wiredhs

Music: Poofy Reel by Kevin Macleod.

The Wired Homeschool is a proud member of the Tech Podcast Network. For more family-friendly tech podcasts visit techpodcasts.com

1

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes