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Confessions of a Digitally Distracted Homeschool Dad – The Wired Homeschool

I have a confession to make: I’m a distracted homeschooling dad. My problem isn’t golfing on the weekends, working long hours, or hanging out with guys shooting hoops every night. No, my problem is in my pocket. I’m a digitally distracted dad.

Confessions of a digitally distracted homeschool dad

Photo Credit: Tom Carmony via Compfight cc

When my wife and I started homeschooling there wasn’t much to distract us or my son. We had a gaming console (original Playstation) but it was rarely used, dial-up Internet was still prominent, we had no cable TV, and I had a pager for work that rarely beeped. Continue Reading →

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10 Things You Should Never Ask a Homeschool Dad

Homeschool dads are an interesting breed. Some of us handle the majority of the homeschooling, others (like myself) pitch in when needed, and others fall somewhere in-between. We like talking about and answering questions about homeschooling but there are some things you should never ask a homeschool dad.

10 Things that will make a homeschool dad angry

1. What curriculum do you use? We don’t know. Even if we do, our wives probably use something different for fill in the subject so don’t ask us, ask our wife.
See the other nine questions

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Privacy and Accountability Go Hand-in-Hand – The Wired Homeschool

Privacy and accountability go hand-in-hand. Parents have a moral obligation to protect the privacy of their children.

Brad McFadden wrote an excellent article about privacy and accountability in our families. In it, he discusses why privacy is important and how accountability helps to protect a family’s privacy. Here’s and excerpt of that article:

As parents we should be very mindful of our children’s privacy. We should also foster openness within our families. Openness encourages trust, honesty, liberty and acceptance. Secrets are destructive to relationships and an ongoing tolerance of secrets is fertile ground for mistrust, deception and unfaithfulness. Privacy itself, however, is not a negative attribute. As our children get older their sense of privacy develops and grows. As parents we must mold and help them understand their new inner desire for privacy. Just like with all their maturing personal needs and desires it is our responsibility to teach them what is appropriate and what is not. It seems to me there is a growing confusion between privacy, secretiveness, openness and accountability. With the following principles I attempt to bring some distinctive clarity as I examine privacy, its value and its limits.

Read the rest of the article at Grace Junkies.

Besides the moral and philosophical reasons for protecting privacy, there are also practical steps parents can take to protect the privacy of their children. This hand infographic gives some great advice.

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Every Year

Our kids have a way of reminding us there’s sometimes more than one answer to a question.

Here’s a conversation I had with my young daughter once while driving in the van:

Me: Hey, A. When’s your birthday?
A: October 13
Me: What year?
A: Umm, EVERY YEAR!

Touché.

Don’t get so focused on getting the right answer from your kids. Let them explore every possible answer.

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10 Rules for Dating My Daughter for Geek Dads

I’m sure many of you dads (and moms) have seen similar rules posted somewhere before. I like them, I really do, but times have changed and I decided they needed to be updated. Keep in mind that these are tongue-in-cheek and purposefully exaggerated to make a point. So, I present to you:

10 Rules for Dating My Daughter for Geek Dads

Rule One:
When you pull into my driveway don’t text my daughter telling her that you’ve arrived. Come to the door and have a conversation with me because it’s going to take her a little longer to get ready. More on that later.

Rule Two:
Do not snap pics of my daughter and post them to every social media network tagged #hottie or I will set your smartphone on fire. Pretty hot, huh?

Rule Three:
I am aware that it is considered cool for boys of your age to constantly text and message all of their friends even when involved in a conversation with people around them. Don’t do this. Put the phone down and give my little girl all of your attention.

Rule Four:
Assume the answer to any text asking my daughter for pics with her clothes off is “NO.” It’s illegal and you’d better hope the cops find you before I do. Don’t ask for “hot” cosplay pics either.

Rule Five:
It is usually understood that in order for us to get to know each other, we should “friend” or “follow” each other on various social networks. Please do not do this. You can text me if your car runs out of gas or you need help changing a flat tire but I don’t care if you slept through class yesterday.

Rule Six:
I have no doubt you are a popular fellow, with many “friends” on Facebook and they hang on your every word. This relationship is not “Facebook official”. You are not in a relationship with my daughter that warrants any kind of public acknowledgement.

Rule Seven:
No texting while drivingDo not use your smartphone and drive. EVER. Put the phone in your pocket and leave it there. In fact, turn it off before you get in the car. You can’t even walk and text without nearly killing yourself why do you think it’s OK while driving?

Rule Eight:
While you’re waiting for my daughter to get ready I will be looking through your smartphone for any inappropriate content or apps. If I find such content I will keep the phone, call your parents, and send you home.

Rule Nine:
Do not lie to me. I know how to use the Internet. I’ve been using social media longer than you’ve been alive and I know where and how to dig up all the garbage that you’ve posted online or texted to your friends.

Rule Ten:
Yes, I’m a geek but that doesn’t mean I won’t burn you if you hurt my little girl. There are far worse fates you could suffer than being beaten to within an inch of your life. The Internet never forgets and I know how to use that to my advantage.

Do you have any new rules for your kids now that dating has gone digital?

Featured image credit: kalexanderson

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